Perfect joints

Perfect joints
for prevention

Perfect joints

The professional construction of a silicone joint makes a significant contribution to avoiding mould formation. Here, the professional tradesperson constructs the surface of the sealant so that it does not form grooves and can therefore not collect or accumulate moisture. OTTO offers tradespeople processing equipment and very easy to use professional products for this. The soapy solution for the removal of the sealants should be used sparingly so as to leave as little residue as possible behind on the sealant. Detergents, which are often used as cheap soapy solutions, are less suitable as they often leave nutrient-rich and organic residues behind which then serve as a food source for mould.

Sealants with fungicides

Sealants
with fungicides

Sealants with fungicides

Manufacturers of sealants usually add fungicides to silicones for sanitary spaces. These anti-mould toxins are able to kill mould or at least inhibit its growth. The fungicides are only applied in small amounts to the sealants, however, so that they themselves are not a hazard to health. They are washed off in the course of time, which limits their effective duration. For this reason, anti-mould agents like these cannot guarantee safe protection in the long term, and the new ‘settlers’ will soon find a new habitat.

Joint cleaning and care

Regular
joint care

Joint cleaning and care

In addition to perfect workmanship, the right room hygiene is essential for ensuring that mould cannot take hold. One simple means: ensure damp tiles are free from water with a T bar. Wash joints clean after showering and dry them. A clean cloth is sufficient here. If you want to be sure, you should use OTTO Anti-Mould Spray once a month, which is then rinsed off with clean water after the required contact time. Moreover, the surface can be treated with a 70-80% alcohol solution (e.g. methylated spirits) for subsequent disinfection.

Service joints


Caution, service joint!

Service joints

‘A service joint is a joint exposed to strong chemical and/or physical influences, whose sealant must be checked and replaced if necessary at regular intervals in order to prevent further damage,’ is what it says in the DIN 52 460 Building Standard. This refers to, amongst other things, floor and wall joints in sanitary spaces or the expansion joints between large tiled surfaces. But this DIN is tricky. Because service joints are not clearly defined. And they are not subject to guarantee – similar to wearing parts in cars. So that if, therefore, mould formation occurs, tradespeople or architects cannot be held liable for defects.